Monday, March 27, 2017
At least seven Jewish community centers in the United States and Canada received bomb threats while they were hosting Purim events.
Seventy percent of American voters see anti-Semitism in the country as a “very” or “somewhat serious” problem, up from 49 percent a month ago, according to a new poll.
Almost daily accounts of vandalized cemeteries, spray-painted swastikas and bomb threats to JCCs and other Jewish agencies have naturally evoked considerable alarm.
In one way or another, all Jews are choosing to be Jewish through a process of “social identity performance,” which depends on the behaviors and choices they present to each other and the outside world.
A professor of Sephardic studies at the University of Washington, is deeply passionate about preserving Ladino — which is also known as Judeo-Spanish, Judezmo or Judio — the language his grandfather’s family spoke in their native Greece.
A new app to teach youth about the Holocaust will be a centerpiece of Switzerland’s chairmanship of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.
The Jewish Children’s Museum in Brooklyn was evacuated after receiving an emailed bomb threat. The museum was evacuated Thursday morning following a call to the police.
Jewish Security Application, is being launched by the Community Security Service, a New York-based group that works to enhance security at Jewish institutions.
JCCs in Colorado, Delaware, Connecticut and Vancouver, Canada, received bomb threats via email either Tuesday night or Wednesday morning.
The rash of JCC bomb threats and cemetery desecrations, combined with a general sense that the country is becoming more intolerant, has Jews on edge in ways they haven’t been in years.

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