Insulin pumps have helped many people with diabetes lead more active, healthier lives.

The problem is that the cost of the pump and the supplies often makes pumping cost prohibitive to people in the developing world and those who do not have medical insurance.

A father-son team from Israel, though, is trying to change that with an innovate and tiny pump that may make pumping affordable.

Avi Keret of Touche Medical points out that their new patch pump is not innovative because it is a medical pump, but instead because it is affordable.

“Our device gives the same amount of medication as any other pump; it just delivers the drug in a way that allows for a better quality of life,” Keret recently told ISRAEL21c.

He also sees the pump he has developed with his son Amir as giving people who cannot afford to shell out thousands of dollars a new option to better manage their health.

“We’ll offer them an alternative,” Keret said. “People who have or don’t have medical insurance will be able to afford it. Children all over the world will be able to use it.”

The pump will also feature special designs for children and use technology that will help deliver a more precise dosage than existing pumps.

“The three advantages are that it is smaller, the price is cheaper and the accuracy is supposed to be better, so that it can achieve a better blood-sugar balance using a very small amount of the drug. That’s important especially for the pediatric population,” Dr. Orly Eshach Adiv deputy chief of pediatrics at the Meyer Children’s Hospital said.

“It should also be more user-friendly than other patch pumps, giving the parents the ability to control the results easily for their kids.”

An additional advantage of the new pump is that it is also more environmentally friendly because it requires fewer disposable parts.

“All other pump patches for diabetes are for three-day use,” Keret explained.“ Ours lasts one year, and you only throw away the disposable parts. We plan to give the device for free and charge only for the disposable parts.”

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