The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) today reiterated its concerns over recent alleged anti-Semitic incidents that have taken place across New York City.

According to the NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force, a Bukharian Jewish man who was assaulted on December 2 near a subway station at New Utrecht Avenue and 43rd Street in Brooklyn while the attacker purportedly yelled “F – Jew, where you running? Slow down you F – Jew.” Earlier this week, on December 1, the manager of a Judaica store on the Upper West Side of Manhattan was assaulted while the perpetrator allegedly exclaimed “(Expletive) you Jews. I’ll kill you. I’m a Muslim.” According to reports, the most recent incident, which took place today, involved an individual who allegedly yelled anti-Semitic slurs outside of the Ahi Ezer Congregation in Brooklyn and was subsequently arrested by police.

Recent blazes set in at least six buildings in Forest Hills, Queens also prompted concern among the Bukharian and larger Jewish community, however NYPD investigations have reportedly determined that the fires were not motivated by anti-Semitism.

“While there is no reason to believe that the recent anti-Semitic incidents being investigated by NYPD as potential hate crimes are connected, we are, of course, always concerned when Jews are targeted and attacked,” said Evan R. Bernstein, ADL New York Regional Director. “Community leaders and our elected officials must continue to make their voices heard by unequivocally condemning such acts of hate.

“It is also important to remind the community that the vast majority of Jews in the city feel safe and secure,” Mr. Bernstein added. “The NYPD is very much on top of addressing anti-Semitic incidents, and we will continue to work with them to ensure that bias attacks are investigated as hate crimes when appropriate.”

ADL recently announced #50StatesAgainstHate, a new initiative to expand and strengthen hate crimes laws in New York and around the country in partnership with more than three dozen national civil rights, civic, religious and cultural organizations.

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