Multi-Grammy-winning musician Carlos Santana confirmed on March 17 that he will have a concert in Tel Aviv’s HaYarkon Park on July 30—his first concert in Israel in 29 years. The concert is presented by promoter Shuki Weiss and is a part of Santana’s world Luminosity Tour.

Back in 2010, Santana backed out from a scheduled concert in Jaffa due to alleged scheduling conflicts, which at the time were presumed to be pressure from the BDS movement.

Santana’s manager is already attempting to put an end to those pressures. “Carlos Santana is a citizen of the World and he plays his music and spreads his message of Love, Light & Peace wherever he goes,” said Santana manager Michael Vrionis in a statement to the press. “Carlos believes the World should have no borders so he is not detoured or discouraged to play anywhere on this planet. We look forward to performing in Israel this summer.”

Santana’s latest album, “Santana IV,” will be released on April 15, and is a studio album reuniting his esteemed early 1970s Santana band lineup of Gregg Rolie, Neal Schon, Michael Carabello, and Michael Shrive. It is the first time in 45 years that the four of them have recorded together.

The first single from the album, “Anywhere You Want to Go,” was recently released.

Santana reached number one on the US charts in 1999 after a gap of almost 30 years with his album, “Supernatural,” which had the hit songs “Smooth” and “Maria Maria.”

Santana’s last album, “Corazon,” which was released in 2014, featured covers and collaborations with celebrities, including Gloria Estefan.

Santana, who is now 68 years old, was born in Mexico and first became famous in the 1970s for his band, Santana, which made popular a combination of rock and Latin American sound.

Santana was known for his melody, blues-based guitar work set against Latin rhythm in addition to percussion instruments timbales and congas, both of which had not previously been heard in rock music.

Santana, who has won ten Grammy Awards and three Latin Grammy Awards, was listed in Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.

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