Wednesday, May 22, 2019
This Day in Jewish History

This Day in Jewish History

In the year 1066, on December 30, a deadly pogrom that would come to be known as the Granada Massacre took place.
The Black Death—the 14th century global pandemic—killed somewhere between 75 million and 200 million people.
On April 11, troops arrived at Buchenwald. The time was 3:15 pm.
Bergen-Belsen was one of the most notorious and fatal of the Nazi concentration camps.
Bergen-Belsen was one of the most notorious and fatal of the Nazi concentration camps.
About a year after the lottery, having drilled a water well and built houses and roads, Ahuzat Bayit was renamed Tel Aviv.
On April 19, 1943, a rebellion within the Warsaw Ghetto became one of the most lasting examples of Nazi resistance.
It took twenty years from the 1912 Stockholm Olympics until the first Maccabiah Games.
When Jewish scientist Jonas Salk first invented his polio vaccine, he was celebrated as a miracle worker by the international community.
This week marks the anniversary of the Kishinev pogrom, an anti-Jewish riot that left 49 Jewish citizens dead, over 500 wounded and 2,000 families homeless.

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